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Shuttle EMU End Items

The Shuttle extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) consists of 18 separate items. Fully assembled, the Shuttle EMU becomes a nearly complete short-term spacecraft for one person. It provides pressure, thermal and micrometeoroid protection, oxygen, cooling water, drinking water, food, waste collection, (including carbon dioxide removal), electrical power, and communications. The EMU lacks only maneuvering capability, but this capability can be added by fitting a gas jet-propelled Simplified Aid for Extravehicular Activity Rescue (SAFER) over the EMU’s primary life-support system. On Earth, the suit and all its parts, fully assembled but without SAFER, weighs about 113 kilograms. Orbiting above Earth it has no weight at all. It does, however, retain its mass in space, which is felt as resistance to a change in motion.

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1. Primary Life-Support System (PLSS) Self-contained backpack unit containing an oxygen supply, carbon-dioxide-removal equipment, caution and warning system, electrical power, water-cooling equipment, ventilating fan, machinery, and radio

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2. Battery Battery that supplies electrical power for the EMU during EVA. The battery is rechargeable in orbit.

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3. EMU Electrical Harness (EEH) A harness worn inside the suit to provide bioinstrumentation and communications connections to the PLSS

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4. Secondary Oxygen Pack (SOP) Two oxygen tanks with a 30-minute emergency supply combined, valve, and regulators. The SOP is attached to the base of the PLSS. The SOP can be removed from the PLSS for ease of maintenance

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5. Displays and Control Module (DCM) Chest-mounted control module containing all controls, a digital display, the external liquid, gas, and electrical interfaces. The DCM also has the primary purge valve for use with the Secondary Oxygen Pack

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6. Service and Cooling Umbilical (SCU) Connects the orbiter airlock support system to the EMU to support the astronaut before EVA and to provide in-orbit recharge capability for the PLSS. The SCU contains lines for power, communications, oxygen and water recharge, and water drainage. The SCU conserves PLSS consumables during EVA preparation.

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7. Contaminant Control Cartridge (CCC) Cleanses suit atmosphere of contaminants with an integrated system of lithium hydroxide, activated charcoal, and a filter contained in one unit. The CCC is replaceable in orbit.

8. Arms (left and right) Shoulder joint and shoulder bearing, upper arm bearings, elbow joint, and glove-attaching closure.

9. EVA Gloves (left and right) Wrist bearing and disconnect, wrist joint, and fingers. The gloves have loops for attaching tethers for restraining small tools and equipment. Generally, crew members also wear thin fabric comfort gloves with knitted wristlets under the EVA gloves.

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10. Maximum Absorption Garment (MAG) An adult-sized diaper with extra absorption material added for urine collection.

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11. Hard Upper Torso (HUT) Upper torso of the suit, composed of a hard fiberglass shell. It provides structural support for mounting the PLSS, DCM, arms, helmet, In-Suit Drink Bag, EEH, and the upper half of the waist closure. The HUT also has provisions for mounting a mini-workstation tool carrier.

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13. Liquid Cooling-and-Ventilation Garment (LCVG) Long underwear-like garment worn inside the pressure layer. It has liquid cooling tubes, gas ventilation ducting, and multiple water and gas connectors for attachment to th PLSS via the HUT.

12. Lower Torso Spacesuit pants, boots, and the lower half of the closure at the waist. The lower torso also has a waist bearing for body rotation and mobility, and D rings for attaching a safety tether.

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14. Communications Carrier Assembly (CCA) Fabric cap with built-in earphones and a microphone for use with the EMU radio.

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15. Helmet Plastic pressure bubble with neck disconnect ring and ventilation distribution pad. The helmet has a backup purge valve for use with the secondary oxygen pack to remove expired carbon dioxide.

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16. Airlock Adapter Plate (AAP) Fixture for mounting and storing the EMU inside the airlock and for use as an aid in donning the suit.

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17. Extravehicular Visor Assembly (EVA) Assembly containing a metallic-gold-covered Sun-filtering visor, a clear thermal impact-protective visor, and adjustable blinders that attach over the helmet. In addition, four small "head lamps" are mounted on the assembly; a TV camera-transmitter may also be added.

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18. In Suit Drink Bag (IDB) Plastic water-filled pouch mounted inside the HUT. A tube projecting into the helmet works like a straw.


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